Category Archives: LTE Router

British businesses urged to prepare for arrival of 4G

British businesses have been urged to do more to prepare for the arrival of 4G.

Sean Duffy, who is head of technology at Barclays Bank, has claimed that the arrival of super-fast internet in the UK will encourage even more consumers to shop online using mobile devices.

In an interview with bmmagazine.co.uk, he encouraged businesses to prepare for the proliferation of 4G routers by ensuring their website is fully-optimised for mobile devices.

He said: “We’re already seeing a growing trend for consumers to browse on their mobile or tablet rather than their PC and while the introduction of 4G networks is unlikely to cause technical problems for online businesses, it is likely to accelerate this trend.

“Companies that are already prepared for consumers to use their sites from a mobile device stand to gain a significant competitive advantage. It isn’t enough to simply replicate the big screen PC experience for mobile devices.”

According to cable.co.uk, Duffy was reacting to research that suggested nine out of ten online businesses were yet to optimise their website for mobile devices. That’s despite over a third of businesses reporting growth in mobile traffic since the turn of the year.

The research, conducted by Barclays, revealed that more than half of Brits bought a product online using a mobile device last year.

EE still running the 4G market

EE is still running the 4G market, with a company prediction that there will be one million 4G customers by the end of the year.

The mobile phone network has announced that 318,000 people are currently running their super fast mobile broadband service. Around 1,600 medium and large businesses have also signed up, according to ibtimes.co.uk.

EE has released financial results for the first quarter of 2013 and claimed last month that it wanted to reach the big one million this year. With O2, Vodafone and Three all hot on its heels to offer 4G sims in the next few months, competition could be stiff.

Chief Financial Officer of EE, Neal Milson said: “Today’s results are in line with our expectations, and we are making good progress focusing on high value segments.

“We expect to strengthen our industry leadership position in the year ahead as the 4G roll out continues and we introduce double-speed 4GEE.”

Sky.com reports that this is the first time the network has released any subscriber numbers, since it launched the service in November 2012.  Average speeds are expected to reach 20Mbps in ten different cities by the end of June, according to company predictions.

EE has around 27 million customers and expects to have 4G coverage for 70 per cent of the population by the end of the year.

4G rollout set to fuel high-tech adverts

The rollout of the 4G network is set to spark advances in the adverts appearing on smartphones, reports ft.com.

Reporter Robert Cookson explained that the ultrafast nature of this next-generation internet access will supply the bandwidth for marketers to create some truly advanced content – adverts that are personalised to the user and that are able to ask them questions.

Mobile advertising spending more than doubled in 2012 in the UK, according to Mr Cookson, with this investment not forecast to let up. Among the innovations due to appear thanks to 4G routers and sims is speech recognition technology within adverts.

Victor Malachard, chief executive of Adfonic, said: “I’d say what makes mobile different is first and foremost the personal nature of the device. If you’re engaging with a person through a smartphone or tablet, you’re going to have that person’s attention far more than if you were engaging with them through desktop or television or print.”

The possibility of using the 4G network for such rich media adverts largely relies on consumer take-up of the service and mobile network EE is confident of hitting its target of one million customers by the end of the year, reports theregister.co.uk.

It has signed up 318,000 people for 4G so far – it currently has a monopoly on the service but rivals will join the fray later this year.

4G is a viable alternative to fixed line on construction sites, says Kier

4G is to become an important tool on the modern construction site, says the head of construction IT at Kier.

Peter Banner says that communications are an essential tool on construction sites. With plans changing all the time, having data access insures that the developers are working to the latest drawings.

Traditionally, Banner said that the organisation would order in a fixed line and use an ad-hoc 3G system in the interim period. However, he said that the 3G network was simply not robust enough to handle the construction giant’s demands.

“[3G units] were quite limited in the amount of data we could transfer and the service we could provide over it,” Banner told telegraph.co.uk.

Now the company has moved over to 4G and Banner says that the difference is incredible.

A single 4G unit is enough for 35 people to connect their laptops and VoIP phones. The amount of bandwidth available on 4G is so great, that the company says that it could add CCTV and video conferencing capabilities as well.

Banner boasts that the units are built into flight cases containing the 4G router, switches and ‘network optimisation technology’. If there is no power available, the units can simply be plugged into a generator.

In related news, theregister.co.uk has reported that 28,000 Londoners will 40 days to fit their free filters before the city is flooded with 4G signals to test the effect on the Freeview television spectrum.

2N Speedroute 4G LTE Router – Get Ready For 4G

The UK is getting high speed 4G wireless broadband and Everything Everywhere (EE) – owner of Orange and T-Mobile will be the first UK mobile provider to roll out 4G LTE services.  in order to take advantage of this new hiogh speed 4G service you will need an LTE compatible device, either a 4G LTE Phone or 4G LTE Smartphone or for a computer user you might want to use a 4G Modem to provide a 4G internet connetion for your laptop or PC.

2N Speedroute 4G LTE Router

If you want to really take advantage of the new high speed 4G service for several computers then you might want to consider a 4G LTE Router like the 2N Speedroute.  This is a 4G Router that will work with the new LTE 4G Services as well as working with the existing 3G services such as DC HSPA+ (Up To 42Mbps), HSPA+ (Up To 21Mbps) and HSPA (Up To 7.2Mbps).  this means that if you have not yet got 4G Internet then you could install the 2N Speedroute 4G LTE Router safe in the knowledge that when 4G is available you can upgrade to your chosen 4G LTE service provider and start using the higher speed 4G Internet service.

The 2N Speedroute is priced at £345.00 and is available for next working day delivery in the UK from the 4G Router Store.

 

The 2N Speedroute 4G Router will provide both wired and wireless ALN connectivity so you can connect your compauters, games consoles, IP Cameras, tablets, smartphones and televisions.  In fact anything that you would normally connect to a normal wired broadband router can be connected to the 2N Speedroute 4G Router.

 

How Fast Is 3G?

With the recent hype from Everything Everywhere (Orange and T-Mobile) about their new 4G LTE Service which they are calling 4GEE, many comparisons are being made between existing 3G and the new 4G wireless broadband services.  EE (Everything Everywhere) are using some Ofcom report which states that the average 3G Speed in the UK is only 1-2Mbps and their new 4G service will be five times faster (I suppose that means 5-10Mbps).

This 1-2Mbps is not the reality for most users and since Three.co.uk updated their 3G network to the new HSPA+service which offers download speeds up to 21Mbps, many users find that their download and upload speeds on 3G are around 5-6Mbps for download and 2Mbps for upload and many users of traditional fixed line ADSL broadband services in rural and semi-rural locations do not get this kind of speed and are moving to 3G wireless broadband internet.

When we tested our 3 Mobile SIM card inside a Zalip CDG561WE 3G Router which is a HSPA+ Router we consistently got 12Mbps download speeds and 2Mbps upload speeds which we thought was very impressive.

How Fast Is 3G - CDG561WE Speedtest with 3 Mobile SIM

So when you are asking the question How Fast is 4G then you should also ask How Fast Is 3G so you can make a proper comparison when deciding whether or not to invest in a new 4G LTE Router or 4G Modem and whether existing 3G mobile broadband is enough for you especially as many networks still cap your 3G data limits when using a 3G Modem, 3G Dongle or 3G Router with many of the uncapped 3G data plans only available for use in 3G Smartphones.

iPhone 5 Release Date – 12th September 2012

The Apple iPhone 5 will be with us in the next few days and we can anticipate the usual rush for Apple fans to get their hands on this latest version of the popular smartphone.  Long queues outside Apple Stores and the endless quest online searching for the best mobile phone network plan to reduce the initial cost of owning this desirable smartphone.

However, this year you will now be able to get lightning fast 4G LTE services on your iPhone 5 because Everything Everywhere (Orange and T-Mobile) have also launched their 4G LTE network in the UK offering download speeds up to 25Mbps using their 1800Mhz spectrum.  This means that when you are choosing your iPhone 5 4G LTE service provider then Orange and T-Mobile are going to be the networks of choice, leaving O2 and Vodafone loyalists with ‘slow’ 3G connectivity.  Will this perfect timing of 4G LTE network upgrade and the launch of the iPhone 5 LTE create a perfect storm for the UK mobile phone operators and users with a swing towards Orange and T-Mobile as the leading UK mobile phone operator, burgeoning their already huge customer base of over 28 million customers?

Like any 3G or 4G technology, the speed available using the new 4G LTE network with your 4G LTE Phone will depend upon the distance to the tower and the number of connected users downloading content at the same time.  In the USA, many users of Verizon’s 4G LTE Network report an average download speed of only 8Mbps which many users of existing 3G HSPA+ technology in the UK already report so 4G LTE may only offer slightly higher average data speeds.

Whilst this is all good new for the iphone 5 launch and the launch of the new 4G LTE Network, lets not forget that that high speed 4G LTE service could also be used to provide internet for the home and in recent 4G LTE trials using a 4G LTE modem (4G Dongle) users found that they could get a high speed mobile broadband connection which means that the 4G LTE Network needs new 4G hardware in the form a an LTE Router to enable users to insert their 4G LTE SIM Card into the router to get high speed mobile broadband to share in their home or business or a 4G LTE Travel Router to enjoy high speed mobile broadband on the go.

Voice turns to Data

Have you noticed in the last year or so that you have been considering how you use your mobile device a little differently? The priority in your bundle used to be how many free minutes do I get? What is the calling rate between networks or to fixed lines? How many free texts do I get? etc.

Now we are starting to think a little more about how much data we are consuming on a monthly basis and what our priorities are. Consequently the operators are starting to do battle on the data limits, notably 3 who are offering unlimited downloads (read the small print re. fair usage) The fact is however, that although the networks have been striving for some time to get more data traffic and consequently revenues, essentially the networks of the last 10 – 15 years were designed primarily to support Voice. This is the case even with 3G. Data has been an add-on and always in contention with voice connections which have been the priority. After all, the money has been in voice and even now continues to be so.

This is causing the networks a quiet crisis as they struggle to keep pace with user demands and the rush of access products flooding the markets in both smart phones and dongles/routers. Within new LTE and 4G networks the intention is that all traffic will be carried as IP data. In this situation the payload can be voice, data, video, IM, whatever it will be handled within an ‘all IP’ connection driven infrastructure. When this becomes the case the way networks are billed with regard to Data will become ever more critical and even if traditional voice connections may well originate or terminate within traditional ‘non IP’ networks.

The considerable challenge of these new networks is the dynamic nature of the traffic. In the past capacity has been engineered on the basis of factored numbers of dedicated switched channels within an area or cell site. In the future it maybe more difficult to predict what sort of capacity is going to be needed at certain points when access devices can potentially run at high Mbit/s speeds and demand being non linear.

What remains to be seen is will the new networks deliver on their promises in terms of capacity and provide a sensible charging medium to reflect the value offered in an all IP data world?

What will happen when Mobile Broadband is faster than Fixed Broadband?

What makes the UK Telecoms market different to other countries?

In the UK, particularly since deregulation got into full swing in the early 90’s the UK has been arguably one of the most vibrant and competitive telecoms markets in the world. The 90’s saw the arrival of the Cable companies primarily backed by US money and a serious ‘we are going to show you guys how to build a network buddy attitude!’ They came, they went. They spent a whole lot of money and they left what is now Virgin Media to pick up the pieces of confusion and debt. But, they did leave, I believe, one of the most advanced access networks in the world. One in fact that BT are still trying to emulate today with their ‘fibre to the curb’ roll out. Virgin Media have fibre to within 500M or less of the majority of urban houses in the UK. They also have 2 distinct networks, one offering Broadcast TV and the other Telephony. It doesn’t reach the rural areas as that proved too expensive to build in the early days when there were regulatory targets to meet. But it does mean that they can offer super fast, by today’s standards, broadband speeds and they are doing this today over their TV infrastructure with cable modems. It does also mean that they have choices in the future as to how they turn up the wick on their bandwidth delivery.

This all sounds great and if you compare the speed you can get on VM to the other UK broadband suppliers, it is, on average faster at around 12 – 14M. But, compare this to what you can get from an efficient HSPA service on Mobile Broadband. Where there is service and capacity you will see similar speeds of 12Mbit/s on your speed test! Personally I would not believe it until I saw it myself recently. This is the tip of the iceberg if you read what LTE and 4G services can deliver to even a moving point, let alone a fixed wireless point i.e. 500Mbit/s + . It makes the fixed network look quite lame. But all is not that simple – is it ever?! Right now, if you turned that speed onto your mobile network you would need to call your Bank Manager everyday to arrange an overdraft. There are considerable obstacles to overcome both technically and commercially to make these networks seriously competitive in the medium term but fasten your seatbelts as the fast ride into the competitive future is very close at hand and that can only be good for consumers!

 

4G and TV

What has Digital TV got to do with 4G Mobile?

Well, it is in fact very closely linked and it’s critical that the Digital TV Switchover we are all hearing so much about these last years goes ahead completely in 2012. The Government and broadcasters have been working hard for the last 10 years on making sure we are all moved off the old analogue delivery method and onto Digital. Most people have a DigiBox or it built into our TV sets and the final furlong is in sight now.

But have you asked why? Sure, it seems obvious that the signal quality will be better with HD channels being broadcast and new transmission techniques and more channels on Freeview but there is much more to it than that.

The radio waves in the UK are very busy and have been for some time. We all watch TV, listen to the radio, use our Mobiles and use a host of other wireless devices from WiFi to remote keys for cars and doors. All of this needs to operate within a known frequency band whether it is a licensed or unlicensed frequency band. Be very afraid if you start to interfere with some other electrical function or critical service – you may have the RA (Radio Agency) to deal with! To do a serious explanation of UK frequency spectrum would take a PhD thesis but the critical factor in all of this movement from Analogue TV to Digital TV is to free up the airwaves to launch 4Generation Mobile Broadband services.

It now transpires that this will not be all smooth running and that there will be some interference at the cross over points in the frequencies, particularly around 800MHz. Practically this is going to mean that whoever wins the licenses to operate 4G services is going to have to find some solution to delivering the broadcast services free from interference. This might involve using filters; it might involve paying for a satellite or cable service to those homes affected.

But why would you do that when you are building a super fast mobile network capable of delivering rich media content particularly video? Surely the technology will allow for a facility to deliver to individual homes; after all it is designed to run up to 1GBit/s to a static location. What remains to be seen is will it be economical to do so if a large number of homes have to be guaranteed a broadcast service above and beyond the other mobile connections that will be demanding rich media services.