Tag Archives: 4G Mobile Broadband

EE 4G Tractor at Glastonbury Festival 2013

EE-pimped eco-tractor to provide 4G at Glastonbury

Glastonbury festival-goers will be able to log on to a Wi-Fi hotspot at the event’s campsite with the help of some converted farm equipment, reports telegraph.co.uk.

EE 4G Tractor at Glastonbury Festival 2013

The “EE-pimped eco-tractor” will drive around all weekend, sharing internet access using 4G technology, with people able to track where the vehicle is by following the @EE Twitter account.

Spencer McHugh, brand director at the mobile network, said: “We couldn’t be more excited about this year’s Glastonbury where we will be installing the first ever superfast 4G network at a UK festival to help those on site stay connected.”

He also mentioned how the tractor idea follows in the footsteps of the 4G cabs stunt which the company carried out earlier this year. In terms of the tractor, people within ten metres of the machine should be able to get on to the internet.

EE was the first network in the UK to offer 4G services and is keen to encourage more users to upgrade to 4G sims in the future. The technology allows much faster internet speeds.

Glastonbury, which runs from Wednesday June 26th to Sunday June 30th this year, is considered to be the largest greenfield festival in the world, according to bbc.co.uk. This year’s event site at Worthy Farm in Pilton is 900 acres, with a perimeter of 8.5 miles. All 135,000 tickets for the 2013 edition sold out in under 2 hours.

4G users spend more online thanks to faster speeds

Consumers with 4G mobile devices are more likely to spend more online as a result of their faster connections, thedrum.com reports.

A new study by eDigitalResearch and IMRG found that a third of 4G users have claimed they are ‘likely’ or ‘very likely’ to make more purchases on their mobile devices thanks to their quick internet speeds.

The research, which involved quizzing 2,000 consumers, found that 77 per cent of those with 4G connectivity had already used their devices whilst out shopping, to check prices, availability or read reviews. Tellingly, this figure was at just 53 per cent for those with only a 3G connection.

Elsewhere, the study also found that users of 4G were also more tech-savvy and more engaged with developments in the mobile world than their 3G-using peers. It also found that 14 per cent of all mobiles now came with 4G sims, although not all of them are currently in use.

The usage and effectiveness of 4G was also considered, with the result that 82 per cent of those surveyed who’d used 4G claimed it made browsing ‘faster’ or ‘considerably faster’.

Commenting on the findings, commercial director at eDigitalResearch, Derek Eccleston told ichannel.com: “The introduction of 4G technology looks set to have a considerable impact on retail markets.

“With faster internet speeds and a better all-round browsing experience, more and more shoppers are likely to turn to their 4G-enabled device to help them through their multichannel purchase journey. Whilst the thought of this might scare some, brands need to embrace this next step of the mobile revolution and ensure that their entire end-to-end customer journey across all channels is set for more mobile.”

Internet access more important than water, TV and heating, claims poll

Britons would be more ‘stressed out’ by not having internet access than if their heating was switched off, their TVs didn’t work or they didn’t have water, according to a new study.

A survey of 1,000 London commuters by Infosecurity Europe, reported by freshbusinessthinking.com, found more people would worry about not having internet access than some of the most valuable utilities used in everyday life.

The report suggests 38 per cent would be stressed out through lack of internet, followed by 32 per cent claiming lack of water would hinder their stress levels. Furthermore, 18 per cent cited lack of heating while no TV and no washing machine would be a bugbear to eight per cent and four per cent of commuters respectively, adds dezeen.com.

However, with the introduction of 4G to the UK, those worried about lack of internet access can use a 4G sim in a compatible mobile device in order to access their favourite sites or play games online.

Claire Sellick, event director for Infosecurity Europe, commented on the figures: “It is not just at home that the Internet has become a ‘must have’ – the same sentiment falls into the workplace too.

“Having an internet connection is part and parcel of our everyday lives [and is] becoming more important than even heat and water at home, which does seem phenomenal but shows just how dependent we are on the internet,” she added.

The Road to 4G services

What is the situation with 4G services in the UK and what are we really waiting for?

UK users are going to have to wait a bit longer for 4G as the auctions for providing services is scheduled for late 2012 with first launch only possible in 2013 although this would appear impractical.

But what are we really waiting for?

3G services have rolled into 3.5G services and even 3.9G services, which are not standards as such but variations on the theme of the 3GPP (3rd Generation Partnership Project) release schedule. These mid services primarily support HSDPA and HSUPA High Speed Download Packet Access and High Speed Upload Packet Access , The download offering promises speeds towards the terminal of 1.8, 3.6, 7.2 and 14.0Megabit/s. This is not a symmetrical offering and the upload speed is offering a new bearer of 384 kbit/s. The previous maximum bearer was 128 kbit/s. HSUPA or the HSPA offers up-link speeds of up to 5.76 Mbit/s. The name HSUPA was created incidentally by Nokia.

However, this is an ideal view of the world and in practice the speeds achieved are woefully short of this but let’s keep the view ‘blue sky’ for the moment.

In summary, 4G or 4TH Generation services offer a Peak data rates of up to 100 Mbit/s for high mobility and up to approximately 1 Gbit/s for low mobility such as local wireless access. Then it starts to get really very technical as to how this quantum leap in speeds is achieved with super efficient frequency modulation and various advanced radio techniques but maybe we will come back to this at a later date to try to unravel what it is and why it can promise so much. Further analysis is also required of the industry politics the other challenges in providing these super fast access speeds which 10 years ago would have been unthinkable. The bottle neck is going to move out of the access interface and into the core network and that is going to be a considerable challenge to the mobile operators as up until now they could blame everything else for slow response. There is a way to go yet for terminal and network, but as we always say, it can only get better in the future and the future is….well yes, yet to be discovered.